listen here

Patriot Broadcast From the Trenches Schedule 

Or you can mail donations to Henry Shivley at P.O. Box 964, Chiloquin, OR 97624

Electric eye on America: US set to deploy drones for home use

RT News  The US Army has completed a two-week demonstration of a new ground-based sensor system for its drones. It now hopes to get the drones certified for domestic flights, but critics are concerned that their use could breach privacy rights.

The demonstrations took place at the Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, and involved testing the Ground Based Sense and Avoid (GBSAA) system for the MQ-1C Gray Eagle Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV). The drone has been on duty in Afghanistan, but the Army now hopes to deploy it at home.

The Pentagon hopes to send the Gray Eagles to five bases throughout the country: Fort Hood (TX), Fort Riley (KS), Fort Stewart (GA), Fort Campbell (KY) and Fort Bragg (NC). However, it first needs to get the drones certified with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

In February, Congress tasked the FAA with coming up with a plan to integrate rules for drones into domestic aircraft regulations. Under the FAA Modernization and Reform Act, the aviation authority was to produce rules for the certification of the first UAVs to be used by law enforcement and emergency response agencies in May. Licenses for these drones are to be issued in August.

While UAVs are actively deployed by the US military for operations in hot spots like Afghanistan, Pakistan and Yemen, it appears that the government and private companies are now eying their potential uses in the civilian sector.

UAVs, commonly known as drones, offer real promise for an array of domestic applications,” John Villasenor, a nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies at the Brookings Institution, wrote in an opinion piece in The Washington Post. “In an era of ever-tighter budgets, they could dramatically reduce the cost to law enforcement agencies and private companies involved in gathering vital — in some cases, lifesaving — information.”

Potential applications for drones by various government and state agencies include monitoring traffic, inspecting pollution and supervising borders.

In Texas, the Montgomery County Sheriffs Office got hold of a pilotless Shadowhawk chopper. The county police had hoped that eventually the unmanned helicopter could be equipped with weapons like flares, smoke grenades, tasers and rubber bullets to subdue a crowd. However, much to their dismay, a prototype Shadowhawk crashed into a SWAT van during a photo op. This raised the important issue of safety – especially when operating a UAV in a crowded urban area.

Drones also have an ample variety of commercial uses. In fact, this has already been shown by real estate agents in Los Angeles, who deployed a chopper drone to photograph their clients’ homes. However, it turned out that they were breaching current FAA regulations, which state that unmanned aerial vehicles can only be operating within the line of sight and at altitudes bellow 400 feet.

The deployment of drones at home carries a covey of issues, most importantly privacy and safety. Current regulations, as stipulated by Supreme Court cases such as California v. Ciraolo and Florida v. Riley, do not prohibit the government from spying without a warrant on individuals and their property from “public navigable space.” Extending the same regulations to drones could mean that it would be legal to perpetually hover over somebody’s backyard and conduct 24-hour surveillance of their property.

There have already been reports of drones being used by the US government to spy on citizens at home. Journalist Joseph Farah, a known Obama critic, said he recently spotted a drone hovering over his residence in rural Virginia.

Organizations like the American Civil Liberties Union have already expressed their concern over the domestic deployment of drones, saying privacy could be jeopardized by drone use for widespread public surveillance.

In response to this concern, the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) published a “Code of Conduct” for drone manufacturers and operators. The guidelines stipulate the importance of safety, and underscore the importance of preserving the right to privacy.

We will respect the rights of other users of the airspace,” the rules read. “We will respect the privacy of individuals.

However, the “Code of Conduct” is merely a set of non-binding guidelines, with no guarantees that they would be heeded by the government or private drone operators.

This paves way for a future in which an “eye in the sky” will always be “looking at you.” Lets just hope it won’t be able to read your mind.

This entry was posted in News. Bookmark the permalink.
6723
Don't forget to answer the Security Question before you post comment.

14 Responses to Electric eye on America: US set to deploy drones for home use

  1. #1 NWO Hatr says:

    ” it appears that the government and private companies are now eyeing their potential uses in the civilian sector”. Anyone know how to build an EMP? I’m on vacation next week, and I’ve got some spare time on my hands. Also, if anyone knows where to find video of that prototype Shadowhawk crashing into the SWAT van during the photo op, PLEASE post a link on this site. That’s got to be well worth the price of admission

  2. #1 NWO Hatr says:

    Thanks, Angel. Appreciate the effort.

  3. diggerdan says:

    If you got to be licenced to fly a plane then do ya got to be licenced to fly a drone. You know that there will be some hot dog out there that will goof up. Was that UAV that crashed into that swat van user error or a malfunction,because I can just see it happening that a drone equipted with crowd control , etc devices could easily malfunction and hurt a lot of innocents. Drones would be good for border patrol though.

    • Angel-NYC says:

      I don’t have an answer for you, diggerdan. I would say no, there is no license (there should be). In TX, I know of use by the militery, law enforcement/cops, a kid that made a homemade drone & put the test flight over South Padre Island on uTube, and the UT kids that hacked-in. I’m sure there are more, but I’m willing to bet there isn’t a license. Several people in Houston have been injured, even died, because of being hit by “miniature hellicopters.” They aren’t exatly happy about drones flying around.

  4. #1 NWO Hatr says:

    Thanks for trying, Henry & Angel. Obviously, the government doesn’t want the public to see a $500,000 drone, paid for with their tax dollars, going up in smoke, not to mention whatever the cost of the SWAT van was!

    • Angel-NYC says:

      No, they don’t. They say the drone made it undamaged. I found a video of the test (in spanish). It was a home video of the entire test. At the end it showed them hosing down the vehicle and the drone landing, but it didn’t show the hit. Unlike the aftermath of the Naval drone that crashed in Maryland last month, this one is not out there for us to see.

      • Angel-NYC says:

        Correction-The spanish video was a Shadowhawk test at the Loredo Fire/Public Safety International Training Facility. (I found it in English) Montgomery/Houston say the drone made it (yea, right), but there’s absolutely no public photos or video.

  5. #1 NWO Hatr says:

    Thanks for trying, anyway.

    • Angel-NYC says:

      Hey, (after seeing the TX front page photo of 2 men {were they cops, soldiers, I don’t know} dressed as soldiers with machine guns in front of the SWAT truck and the drone in the foreground) I wanted to see the before & after shots too. From “cocky” to OOPS!
      No, no, they couldn’t let anyone see That. LOL

  6. #1 NWO Hatr says:

    Makes you wonder why they didn’t just photoshop the whole mess, and call it all good.

  7. Howard T. Lewis III says:

    You all have been voting for sex offenders and sadists who piss away your money over the past SIX TERMS. Don’t blame me.I did not vote for any of them. I voted for McKinney. And next I am going to vote for Dr.Ron Paul. Take your stink elsewhere. We need a return to competent government and an end to the circus poodle mewling and prancing by congress. Kill your God damned CFRtv!!! Get a frigging CLUE.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

What is 7 + 12 ?
Please leave these two fields as-is:
IMPORTANT! To be able to proceed, you need to solve the following simple math (so we know that you are a human) :-)